Michigan ranked near the bottom in the country in the amount of federal stimulus dollars per person it received, according to a study, raising questions why a state that led the nation in unemployment for years would not be the focus of the federal jobs bill.

Michigan ranked 46th in the country at $310 per person in federal stimulus funds, according to a study by the Mercatus Center at George Mason University. Michigan ranked 31st in the country with $3.09 billion in stimulus dollars. The per capita number is based on a population of 9.9 million.

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The national average was $350 per person. Vermont received $414 per person. Vermont's unemployment rate was 5.9 percent in June 2010, compared to Michigan's 13.1 percent.

The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act - or the federal stimulus act - allocated $787 billion to spark the economy.

Veronique de Rugy, who conducted the study, said people would expect Michigan to get more stimulus dollars since it has high unemployment rates.

She said either that Obama Administration has not done a good job implementing the stimulus dollars or they don't believe in its own theory that the stimulus would create jobs.

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See also:

Full Time Stimulus Spending - Part Time Work 

Stimulus Spending Goes to Black Holes

Stimulus Boosts Bus Transit

Michigan Pols Approve Stimulus Spending

Pelosi Economics 

Michigan Stimulus Recipients Failing to Report - Part 2

$41 Million in Stimulus Money Went Unreported by Michigan Agency

Green Jobs Training

More Federal Spending On the Way - And the Michigan House Asked for It

Have We Really Been Stimulated?

Cost to Revive Economy With Battery Plant Subsidies: $5 Trillion 

Private Home Weatherization a Stimulus Spending Priority

Stimulus Fails at Job Creation  



 

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Renting out the family summer cottage is a common practice in Michigan, and with today’s technologies, it’s easier than ever, empowered by services like AirBnB, HomeAway, VRBO and more. These short-term rentals mean vacationers can find a place much more easily and inexpensively, while owners can earn some extra money. It seems like a win-win. Not everyone agrees. Some in the accommodations and tourism industries aren’t happy with the increased competition and are advocating for limiting people’s rights to rent out their homes. Some homeowner associations are pushing back as well. And while cities like Detroit and Grand Rapids have mostly embraced home sharing, some local governments have restricted and even banned the practice.

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