Michigan Incomes Up Strong After 4 Years of ‘Right-to-Work-for-Less’

Law says employers can't make paying the union a condition of employment

Michigan’s per capita personal income grew faster than that of 40 other states in 2016. Regionally, only Indiana saw incomes rise faster. (Indiana adopted right-to-work a year before Michigan.)

In 2009, at the low point of the Great Recession and Michigan’s “lost decade,” residents of 39 other states had a higher income than people in Michigan did. By last year, we had risen to No. 31 on this critical measure of economic well-being for families and small businesses.

Last week marked the fourth anniversary of when Michigan’s right-to-work law went into effect. The law prohibits employers from making an employee financially support a union as a condition of employment. One slogan repeated by union advocates then was that the new law was “right-to-work-for-less.”

Stay Engaged

Simply enter your email below to receive our weekly email:

Facebook
Twitter

There aren’t many policies that get near unanimous support from economists, but free trade is one of them. Despite this, a central theme of the 2016 presidential campaign, heard from both political parties, was that free trade was somehow harmful to the United States and corrective action was needed. Mark Perry, an economics professor at the University of Michigan-Flint and scholar with the American Enterprise Institute, makes the case for why President Trump’s assessment of free trade is misguided.

Related Sites