Featured Video Archive

Overpopulation is a Myth

"Are we asking the right questions, or are we still in this old mindset where we think it's all about overpopulation? Because it's not," says Jessica Yu, the Academy Award-winning filmmaker behind the new documentary Misconception. … more

The Detroit Bailout 'Grand Bargain'

Mackinac Center Director of Fiscal Policy Michael LaFaive talks about bailing out Detroit, selling a Detroit Institute of Arts painting, taxpayers being on the hook for Detroit's mismanagement and where Michigan tax dollars could be better used. … more

Why Does 1% of History Have 99% of the Wealth?

Throughout the history of the world, the average person on earth has been extremely poor: subsisting on the modern equivalent of $3 per day. This was true until 1800, at which point average wages—and standards of living—began to rise dramatically. Prof. Deirdre McCloskey explains how this tremendous increase in wealth came about.  … more

From Detroit To The Ivy League: One Student's Journey

Meet Daniel Felix, the valedictorian for Detroit's Cesar Chavez Academy and his winning formula for success: inter-drive, strong family values, school choice.  … more

VoteSpotter: The Easiest Way to Spot an Important Vote

Michigan legislators vote on hundreds of bills every year. Keeping track of them can seem like a full-time job.

Not any more. VoteSpotter alerts you to important votes, but it doesn't stop there. You can vote on their vote, let them know if you agree or disagree, and share your views on social media. It's the easiest way to spot an important vote.

Click here to download now for Apple or Android! … more

EconPop - The Economics of Dallas Buyers Club

In this premiere episode of EconPop, Andrew discusses the economics of Academy Award winner Dallas Buyers Club. Subjects include public health and safety regulations, crony capitalism and the role of regulatory capture, the emergence of black and grey markets, and commercial exchange as a means for increased social tolerance. … more

Does Capitalism Exploit Workers?

Prof. Matt Zwolinski explains why capitalism actually tends to protect workers' interests. And Zwolinski contends that even if it were exploitative, increasing political regulation and control would actually make the problem worse. Increases in government make citizens more vulnerable to the state. Political officials are tempted to exploit this vulnerability for the benefit of the politically well connected. Unlike free market transactions, which are mutually beneficial, when politics is involved one party's gain usually comes at someone else's expense. … more

Play Ball: President Bush's Opening Pitch at Yankee Stadium After 9/11

Now that baseball season has started, it is worth watching the behind-the-scenes action that took place before President George W. Bush's first pitch at Yankee Stadium in 2001. Watch it in honor of those who lost their lives on 9/11 and those serving us today. … more

MEA Lets Two Teachers Out; 8,000 More Not Paying Dues

Coopersville kindergarten teacher Miriam Chanski and Petoskey wrestling coach William "Ray" Arthur sued the Michigan Education Association for not allowing them to exercise their rights to leave the union and stop paying dues. The union threatened to ruin these teachers' credit. Not intimidated, the teachers continued to stand for their rights, refusing to go along with a settlement that would have forced them to keep quiet about being let out of the union. Eventually, the union backed down, allowing the teachers to do what they should have been able to do all along. … more

Mackinac Center on Fox Business: Hollywood Exodus

The Mackinac Center's managing editor of Michigan Capitol Confidential, Manny Lopez, on Fox Business's "Money with Melissa Francis" show discussing film makers' exodus from Hollywood. … more

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Police seize assets of Michigan residents who have not been charged with crimes. One man was told he could get his belongings back for a price. Another had his bank accounts frozen and was unable to pay bills. He also lost property he called "auctionable." Last year, law enforcement raised over $20,000,000 from seizing personal property.

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