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The Republican Party fully controls most states and at the national level has captured the House, Senate and presidency. By many measures, the party has more power than it has had in many decades. But will that control last? And, more importantly, what policy priorities are coming about from these political victories?

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Meet Some Law Enforcement Officers Who Support Forfeiture Reform

While many interest groups representing law enforcement employees oppose reforming civil asset forfeiture to require a criminal conviction before the state can take ownership of a person’s property, some law enforcement officers support the changes. … more

MSU Spending Big For Post-Nassar PR

Michigan State University pays its top media spokesman $195,765 a year. Now in "crisis mode," MSU has hired another media relations expert at $325 an hour. … more

A Swimming Pool’s Worth of Parking Lot Runoff Not ‘Vital’ To Great Lakes

While the Great Lakes Restoration Initiative does pay for some programs that protect the lakes, it also gives millions of dollars every year for things that have very little impact on them. … more

Michigan May Surpass 2000 Employment Levels Soon

Job growth in the economic recovery following the Great Recession has been fairly steady. If the trend continues — and there’s no way of determining if it will or won’t — Michigan will surpass its 2000 job level peaks in 2020.  … more

Industrial Wind Farms Bring Political Conflict, Recalls and Lawsuits to Township

A legal battle over a proposed wind farm of 63 turbines is brewing in a small community in the Thumb area of Michigan. … more

Airbnb Ban the Latest in Detroit’s Short-sighted Thinking

City of Detroit officials quietly banned homeowners from offering short-term rentals through services such as Airbnb. … more

City Taking In More But Manager Cries Poverty

The amount of property tax revenue collected by all forms of tax jurisdictions in the state rose from $12.8 billion in 2012 to $14.0 billion in 2017, … more

Crime Shouldn’t Pay, but Requiring Reimbursement May Not Pay Off

A law that takes effect next month adds a handful of new crimes to the list of offenses for which violators must reimburse the state or a local unit of government for expenses incurred responding to and prosecuting the crime.  … more

Did School Choice Opposition Help Doom Detroit’s Bid For Amazon HQ?

Media pundits were quick to suggest they knew why Detroit missed making the cut of cities the online retailer Amazon.com was considering for its new headquarters. … more

Illinois Takes Pension Advice From ‘The Simpsons’

Illinois has promised $129 billion more to government workers than it has saved for their pensions. That’s over $10,000 for every man, woman and child in the Land of Lincoln. So the state has cooked up a scheme to pay down these costs. … more

The city of Detroit issued 194 orders to shut down medical marijuana and marijuana-related facilities during the two year-period stretching from Jan. 1, 2016 to Jan. 1, 2018, city data show. Detroit’s Deputy Press Secretary Tiffany Crawford said that some locations that received shutdown orders closed voluntarily, while others “required assistance by the Detroit Police Department for closing.”

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For the Record

Across the state of Michigan, 61,000 people say they commute to work using public transit services; 96,000 people walk and 4 million people drive. … more
Gov. Rick Snyder presented his annual state budget recommendations to the Legislature on Feb. 7. They include a proposal to increase public school spending by $312 million, or as much as $240 per pupil. Reaction from school officials was mixed. … more
When the police have a reasonable suspicion that a crime has been committed they are permitted to seize a person’s property as evidence, or as part of an investigation. … more
Michigan House Minority Leader Sam Singh, D-East Lansing, recently touted a new report on school finance that claims Michigan’s public schools are underfunded. … more
If taxpayers are concerned about the condition of Michigan’s roads, they should know that it’s not their fault. The state agency in charge of road repairs has more money coming in now than in any other year, with one unusual exception. … more
Having fewer students in Michigan doesn't mean there's less money being generated for public schools. In fact, despite a drop in enrollment, Michigan's K-12 public schools are getting more money than ever. … more
A city commission member for the city of Traverse City says they don't have the money to repair the streets. The city's revenues tell a different story. … more
Former Gov. Jennifer Granholm chided the state of California and praised Michigan as the place to live in 2003. Then, less than a month out of office, she bolted to live in the Golden State. … more
The average teacher salary fell to $61,875 in 2015-16, the fifth consecutive year it declined. But the vast majority of public school teachers aren't taking pay cuts. … more
The Detroit Public Schools Community District spends more per student than all but eight of the nation’s 100 largest school districts, or $14,259 … more