Although it may be "free," that's not stopping some legislators from attempting to tax it.

State Rep. Mark Meadows, D-East Lansing, has introduced House Bill 6214, which would tax free meals employees get while working at restaurants and food establishments.

State Rep. Pete Lund, R-Shelby Township, said the bill amazes him.

Currently, restaurants are allowed to provide free or reduced-cost meals to an employee without the employee having to pay sales tax. That would end Oct. 1 if Meadows' bill passes.

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Lund said it amazed him Democrats were willing to give millions of dollars to subsidize Hollywood filmmakers, but then go after waiters and waitresses — many of whom are working for minimum wage — for more money.

"The idea of taxing teens who work at Taco Bell to pay for Michael Moore's fat-cat meals is no way to solve Michigan's problems," Lund said. "All the problems in this state, and the Democrats think this is going to solve our problems?"

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See also:

Michael & Me

The Scene and the Unseen: Act II

Michael Moore and Subsidies: A Love-Hate Story

Senator Says House Is Stalling Reform of Special Tax Perks for Filmmakers

YouTubes Praising Special Tax Breaks for Filmmakers Getting Yanked

Roger Redux: Michael Moore’s Contradictions Are Old News

Politically Correct Capitalism

Fewer People Employed in Michigan Movie Industry Than Before Film Tax Credits Began

Roger Redux: Michael Moore's contradictions are old news

Sorry — Your Film Office Success Story Was Not Found

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