One of the state's "Pure Michigan" ads talks about waking up on Saturdays in a state where we could "find ourselves fishing."

But despite what the advertisement claims, fishing is not an impromptu decision in Michigan, though it is in other states.

Bill Duckwall, owner of Paddling Michigan in Marquette, says he has a charter boat he uses for fishing in South Carolina. He said in that state, he buys a $150 license for his boat and that covers anyone on the boat, meaning only one license is required.

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According to the South Carolina Department of Natural Resources, only the captain of the charter boat is required to have a fishing license. Individuals fishing on that charter boat don't need a license.

The process isn't so pure in Michigan.

"Michigan makes everybody got get a license," Duckwall said.

Michigan DNR Spokeswoman Mary Dettloff said that each person fishing on a boat is required to have his or her own individual license, and that the charter boat also needs a license.

An "all species" nonresident state fishing license costs $42.

The problem, the livery owners says, is that even when the state spends millions to promote tourism, the regulations can get in the way.

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See also:

Taxing Canoes and Kayaks

Tourism Taxes Approved 

Alice in Subsidy Land  

Tourism Study Raises Questions

Spending Tobacco Revenue Like There's No Tomorrow

It's From the Children: "Borrow-and-spend" not just a Washington problem

Tourism Subsidy Beneficiaries Chant on Capitol Steps: "Gimme! Gimme! Gimme!" 

Michigan Promotion Program

COPS, CARS, BOATS AND BANKRUPTCY 

Michigan Rolling in Dough? Gives Out Raises, Plus Millions in Tourism Subsidies 

Tea and Tourism Subsidies 


 

 

 

 

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Ted Nelson is a retired Michigan State Police officer who trained police departments throughout the state on civil asset forfeiture. He believes the practice has been misused and needs to change.

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