The Michigan-based Education Action Group has produced a new documentary saying public schools treat students like "assembly-line workers" and that the system needs to change. "Kids Aren’t Cars" debuted on Feb. 1 and interviews teachers and administrators who want to end public school "drop-out factories."

The documentary focuses mainly on Michigan and looks at low-performing public schools and the reasons these institutions fail students and parents. The film is being produced as a series of short films uploaded on the website.

"If this was a school system where they all had Klan robes, and they did this to our children, we would be marching and screaming [in the street]," said one school administrator in the film’s trailer (seen below).

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The director, Kyle Olson, is the head of the EAG and says he made the film in order to show "what’s really going on" in the public school system. "We spoke with real people down in the trenches of the current system.

"I hope this film shows the problems, but more importantly that there are solutions," Olson said. "There are leaders and ideas that can not only save the public education system but improve it and give parents alternatives if they so choose."

More information about the film, including screenings, outtakes and trailers can be found at www.kidsarentcars.com.

 

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See also:

Parents Pin Hopes on Charter School Lottery

Charter School Demand Continues to Rise

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