The Coldwater City Council admitted it was unconstitutional to stop a tea party group from displaying its signs in a city park and rescinded its ordinance banning signs on Monday.

The city of Coldwater also agreed to pay the legal costs of $8,347.50 for the tea party Common Sense Patriots of Branch County. The tea party group agreed to dismiss its federal lawsuit it had filed in early April.

“Neither the Coldwater City Council or the City Manager ever intended to restrict the First Amendment Rights of the Plaintiffs or any other person,” said John Hutchinson, the City of Coldwater legal counsel, in an email. “On the two occasions that the ‘Common Sense Patriots’ have raised First Amendment concerns with the City, the City of Coldwater responded immediately to assure that there was no infringement. The City of Coldwater will continue to be sensitive to the First Amendment rights of all people.”

Stay Engaged

Receive our weekly emails!

Richard Thompson, president of the Thomas More Law Center, gave credit to Hutchinson for recognizing the ordinance was unconstitutional and taking quick action to rescind it once the lawsuit was filed.

“I would applaud their attorney for realizing that,” Thompson said.

In November, the City of Coldwater banned all signs at its Four Corners public park where the Common Sense Patriots had held numerous rallies.

The Thomas More Law Center law firm filed a federal lawsuit in early April over the infringement of free speech. Attorney Robert Muise said that Coldwater City Manager Jeff Budd objected to the signs because the Common Sense Patriots were “too political” and “too controversial.”

Thompson said the $8,347.50 in legal fees were not what his firm charged Common Sense Patriots, but what would have been awarded in reasonable costs had Thomas More Law Center won the case in court. Thompson said federal law states the defendant must pay reasonable attorney fees if it loses a case based on constitutional law.


See also:

Town Bans Tea Party Signs in Public Park

Coldwater Clarifies Tea Party Sign Ban


Related Articles:

Acton Lecture Series: 'Excuse Me Professor: Challenging the Myths of Progressivism'

Why Can’t Tesla Sell Cars in Michigan?

Thanksgiving Dinner More Expensive for Michiganders Than Surrounding States

Former Energy Regulator Says Bill Would Establish Energy Monopoly

Let's Make a (Special) Deal: Legislators Can't Shake the Habit

Liberty, Prosperity and Humility on Thanksgiving

Stay Engaged

Simply enter your email below to receive our weekly email:


Ted Nelson is a retired Michigan State Police officer who trained police departments throughout the state on civil asset forfeiture. He believes the practice has been misused and needs to change.

Related Sites