Last year, many media headlines were predicting trouble, like these from a Google search for “State of Michigan budget”:

"State Lawmakers Face $460M Budget Hole

“State of Michigan Faces $460M Deficit, Painful Cuts To Be Made"

“Officials Set To Trim State Budget $460M Over 2 Years.”

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Overall state revenue has increased for eight consecutive years, however.


Related Articles:

No Names in State Budget, But 36 Recipients Getting $38 Million

Millions For Local Earmarks, But Not A Cent To Right An Injustice?

Millions Borrowed And Spent For Enviro Cleanups – But Did They Happen?

State Spends $660 Million In Public Debt, But For What?

Governor’s Budget Pays for Medicaid Expansion with a Gas Tax

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There aren’t many policies that get near unanimous support from economists, but free trade is one of them. Despite this, a central theme of the 2016 presidential campaign, heard from both political parties, was that free trade was somehow harmful to the United States and corrective action was needed. Mark Perry, an economics professor at the University of Michigan-Flint and scholar with the American Enterprise Institute, makes the case for why President Trump’s assessment of free trade is misguided.

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