How ‘Ineffective’ Michigan Teachers Get $26k More Than ‘Highly Effective’ Ones

Research shows more letters after a teacher’s name won’t help, but districts pay for them anyway

Under the Utica Community Schools teachers' contract, a teacher deemed “ineffective” can collect as much as $26,000 more each year than a colleague of equivalent seniority who is rated “highly effective.” The difference is due to extra compensation given to teachers who have accumulated academic credentials beyond a bachelors degree, which is a common practice statewide.

The non-profit public policy think tank Brookings Institution stated, "the fact that teachers with master’s degrees are no more effective in the classroom, on average, than their colleagues without advanced degrees is one of the most consistent findings in education research."

Stay Engaged

Simply enter your email below to receive our weekly email:

Facebook
Twitter

Detroit Prep is a top-rated and economically and racially diverse charter school in the city. It's growth means it needs to move out from a church basement and into a new location. Nearby is a former Detroit Public Schools building, sitting empty for years. But, worried about competition, the public school district refused to sell. For years, district and local government officials in Detroit had worked to block public charter schools. They pushed legislation at the Michigan Capitol to hinder them, refused to sell to them, transferred surplus buildings from the district to the city government and imposed deed restrictions on property sales to private developers. All of it was aimed to hinder or even prevent charter school choice outside the confines of the Detroit school district.

Related Sites