March Madness Betting Pools are Illegal in Michigan

Bet with friends at your own risk

The NCAA men’s basketball tournament, March Madness, kicks off today. But if you’re one of the millions that takes part in filling out your brackets and putting some money into a betting pool with your friends, you’re breaking Michigan law.

State law allows an exception for small bets during poker games, but almost everything else is against the law. The state department notes, “Participating in betting pools based on sports, or anything else, is illegal.”

Michigan sponsors a state lottery (with the funds benefiting government), but individuals gambling on themselves is a no-no. So enjoy the tournament – but bet at your own risk.


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